The Recovery
Center of
Baton Rouge
provides a highly structured, Intensive Outpatient Program for adult men, women, and their families struggling with Substance Abuse, Dependence, and Co-occurring Disorders.
Baton Rouge's Leading Addiction Outpatient Treatment Provider

The Recovery
Center of
Baton Rouge

provides a highly structured, Intensive Outpatient Program for adult men, women, and their families struggling with Substance Abuse, Dependence, and Co-occurring Disorders.
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Recovery Center of Baton Rouge has a blog available for loved ones & patients seeking material to keep them informed about addiction recovery processes.

Addiction Recovery During the Holidays

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Friday, October 28, 2016
From the desk of Greg Tiritilli, RAC

The long awaited change of seasons is finally here. As temperatures begin to cool, sober people find themselves facing a multitude of high risk situations.

Parties and gatherings surrounding the fall semester, football and tailgating, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Years can bring up a complicated set of emotions. Staying sober during the holidays means implementing the appropriate coping skills and recovery tools to manage your addiction recovery.

Dealing with excitement and joy can bring about cravings and using thoughts just like depression and anxiety.

First, it’s important to not lose perspective. Certain events are high risk regardless of the motivation behind them. This is not to say that all parties and gatherings are off limits, but even the most benign family function can lead to cravings. It is the sober person’s responsibility to have a plan in place to address temptations should they arise. Having access to transportation to leaving the party, calling or texting a sponsor or sober friend before, during, or after the event, bring a sober support companion with you, and avoid people who will encourage drinking or using.

Second, sobriety requires sacrifice. One of the most difficult challenges for newly sober people is the idea of delayed gratification. If a person can put off their “wants” and focus closely on their “needs” the chances of making an impulsive decision decrease dramatically. If a person can recognize that it is okay to not accept every invitation or go to every event, they can improve their chance at long term sobriety. A person can sacrifice these things now to ensure that they can enjoy them in the future.

Third, develop self-awareness. If you have grief or trauma as a part of your history, holidays can bring up a unique set of difficulties. Certain family members or friends or being involved in holiday events can bring up anxiety, fear, malaise, depression, anger, or any other negative emotion. If you can recognize this as a typical response to the season, then it may be beneficial to take a preventive approach by ramping up 12 step involvement, engaging in activities that will encourage spiritual growth, communicate with members of your recovery network, exercising, healthy eating, journaling, and individual therapy.

It’s always important to pause and take stock of just how far you have come. Having broken free from the bondage of addiction allowed you to have a new lease on life. The effort, concentration, and work that you put in to the “getting sober” process is monumental and it’s this effort that allows you to enjoy the things life can offer. Protect what you’ve worked so hard for by being mindful of what it took to get you here.

Understanding Relapse

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Tuesday, July 21, 2015

From the desk of Rudy L. Troyer, LCSW

“Relapse is part of the recovery process.” This statement is perhaps my biggest pet peeve within the addiction treatment community. It is also a very dangerous view of recovery that implicitly “gives permission,” or at the very least, justification for, relapse. If we tell our patients that they are doomed to fail, what’s the point of them or their families spending thousands of dollars for treatment? Shouldn’t we encourage those suffering addiction that there is hope? That you never have to use or drink again? That you have been given an opportunity to have a new life?

I know many individuals who have been recovered for years without a single relapse. I also know, and have worked with, many who have relapsed. This article is by no means a dig at them. Sometimes, a relapse can become an eye-opening experience for someone who was not fully bought into recovery, and solidify their motivation to fully recover. Other times, unfortunately, it is a fast track to suicide, overdose, or prison.

Shaming patients about their relapse does not work. Loving them through their relapse and having healthy boundaries around their addiction does work. In other words: “I will never tell you it’s okay to relapse, way too many people die or end up in prison. However, it’s not the end of the world, and recovery can still work for you if you want it bad enough.” “It’s time to get into action.”

At The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge, we work diligently with our patients to prevent relapse, and to help them develop meaningful and long term recovery. I fully believe, and have witnessed firsthand, that if a person experiences the true joy, freedom, and comradery that is so easily found in recovery, they will never want to go back to the bondage and pain of their addictions. Recovery is possible and treatment does work!

How to Identify Signs of Substance Abuse

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Thursday, April 02, 2015

From the Desk of Rudy L. Troyer, LCSW

It is oftentimes difficult for family members to identify signs that a loved one is abusing alcohol or drugs. There are various factors that attribute to this difficulty, the main one being denial. The term denial is frequently belabored into (or more appropriately out of) clients who are in treatment for drug addiction or alcoholism. Simply stated, denial is an inability (whether conscious or subconscious) to see reality as it really is. For the addicted person, it may sound like: “Depression is really my problem, not the booze or the cocaine,” or “You’re overreacting, it’s perfectly reasonable to enjoy drinking.”

Identifying signs of substance abuse

Unfortunately, denial does not stop with the addicted person, it usually severely affects the family as well. We are all wired to want to believe that the people we love are okay, if this weren't so, we’d fall apart with anxiety. Addiction and alcoholism hijack this tendency to the point where the family can become blind (either consciously or subconsciously) to the real problem.

Below is a list of common signs, symptoms, and risk factors that are typically associated with someone who is abusing alcohol or drugs:

  • Withdrawal from family and friends
  • Missing work or school
  • Often sick with flu-like symptoms (this could be a sign of pain pill or heroin withdrawal)
  • Dilated pupils or bloodshot eyes
  • A sharp change in demeanor or personality
  • Withdrawal from hobbies, interests, or life passions
  • Increased irritability
  • Increased anxiety or depression
  • A sharp change in sleep patterns (either increased or decreased, depending on the type of substance)
  • A refusal to take an alcohol or drug screen
  • Legal charges (DWI or Possession)
  • Inability to account for changes in spending habits
  • Stealing
  • Elevated liver enzymes (alcohol)
  • Seizures
  • Vomiting
  • Having Blackouts
  • Track marks
  • Finding drug paraphernalia (pipes, rolling papers, straws cut in half, scales, etc.)
  • Traditional therapy and medication management not being effective for mental health symptoms
  • A family history of addiction or alcoholism
  • A history of trauma
  • A history of social problems, low self-esteem
  • Friends, other family members, or co-workers voicing concern about the person's alcohol or substance use
  • Decrease in work or academic performance
  • The person’s life starts to “revolve” around alcohol or substance use
  • Finding drugs or alcohol that the person has hidden
  • Re-currently catching the person in lies.
This list is not exhaustive. If you feel a loved one has a problem with alcohol or drugs, please call for help!

Get to know our team - Garrett Cheramie

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Monday, March 16, 2015
Garrett Cheramie Admissions Coordinator Recovery Center of Baton Rouge Q: What is the most rewarding part of being on staff at The Recovery Center Intensive Outpatient Program?
Being able to watch clients and members of their family rebuild in recovery.
Q: What do you like to do for fun?
Fishing, traveling, LSU football with my daughters, and spending time at the camp with my wife and children.

Q: What is the most challenging aspect of your job?
Knowing that some will lose their life due to this illness and not having the power to stop it.

Q: Do people really recover from drug and alcohol addiction?
Yes. I am able to see it daily in this field. The many miracles that happen are truly a blessing to witness.

Q: Do you have any pets?
I have a Sheltie named Bella, and four fish named Olaf, Elsa, Anna, and Gary.

Q: What are the most common barriers to recovery you see people face in early on in their treatment?
Definitely changing old lifestyles and friends that will be negative to any healthy and spiritual growth; being hopeful and positive when things don’t go exactly your way.

Q: What is your favorite restaurant?
La Mexicana is a favorite of mine. La Fonda Boricua in Spanish Harlem; I only ate their once but it was awesome. My all time favorite is at my house with my wife as chef.

Q: What lead you to work in the addiction recovery field?
After completing treatment myself in 2000, I began working in an acute psych unit, then in a primary residential facility here in Baton Rouge. Truly enjoy giving back what was given to me.

Q: What is your style of facilitating group sessions?
Laid back, but honest. I try to have a setting that is comfortable, yet serious about recovery and the change that is needed.

Q: What is the most important thing you’d like your clients to learn while in treatment?
For them to know that they can handle what life throws at them, to use your support system and enjoy their lives and that being happy is achievable.

Q: Who are your role models?
My PaPa (Grandfather). He showed me so many things about life, respect for self and others, and work ethic; loved that man.

Q: How would you describe The Recovery Center?
A safe place, full of caring people who are there for you at any time without judgement.

Q: What’s your favorite movie?
A Streetcar Named Desire. Also love Casablanca and Gone with the Wind. Rebound: The Legend of Earl “The Goat” Manigault is also on the list.

Get to know our team - Gregg Tiritilli

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Monday, March 02, 2015
Gregg Tiritilli Addictions Counselor Recovery Center of Baton RougeQ: What is the most rewarding part of being on staff at The Recovery Center Intensive Outpatient Program?
I find it incredibly rewarding to be a part of a team that cares so much about the patients and their family. I get to work with the people I look up to, some of the best therapist around. I get to work with my friends. 

Q: What do you like to do for fun?
Live Music, Fishing, Running, Spending time with my family and friends. I love traveling and seeing new places. I’ve also been known to binge on Netflix or Amazon Prime.

Q: What is the most challenging aspect of your job?
It's really hard to know people suffering. For me, the toughest part of the job is to see suffering and not having the power to do anything about it.

Q: Do people really recover from drug and alcohol addiction?
Yes, absolutely.

Q: Do you have any pets?
I have two dogs, A Great Dane and a Lab.

Q: What are the most common barriers to recovery you see people face in early on in their treatment?
Changing lifestyle and old habits, replacing unhealthy relationships, dealing with consequences, managing boredom and mood swings.

Q: What is your favorite restaurant?
That's hard to answer, I kinda cycle through favorites. I’ve been on a Pho kick lately, so Saigon Noodle and Dream Berry. I have also been eating at La Frontera, they make the best tacos in town.

Q: What lead you to work in the addiction recovery field?
When I was getting sober I had some really great counselors, specifically a lady named Angie Haught. She help save my life. It inspired me to do the same.

Q: What is your style of facilitating group sessions?
Conversational and honest. I try to create an environment that is comfortable and safe in which people can get the support and direction they need. Humor along with sincerity, truth along with compassion.

Q: What is the most important thing you’d like your clients to learn while in treatment?
I’d like them to learn how to live and enjoy their lives without going to jail or losing their families. I’d like my clients to learn how to deal with all the stuff life throws at you in a healthy way so that they can achieve their goals.

Q: Who are your role models?
My mother and father, Jesus, Buddha, The Beatles (not Ringo), Gandhi, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, Dostoevski, Joe Strummer, my wife and daughter, Krishna, John Fante, Jean Paul Sartre, VanGogh, Joan of Arc, Jonas Salk, Malala Yousafzai, Carl Sagan, and Khalil Gibran to name a few.

Q: How would you describe The Recovery Center?
A healthy and supportive environment where people can find friendship, structure, and a hot cup of coffee.

Q: What’s your favorite movie?
I have varied taste in movies. I like everything from David Lynch and Stanley Kubrick films to superhero movies. Jaws is always on my top 10 list.

Get to know our team - Marcia J. Bannister

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Tuesday, February 24, 2015
Marcia Bannister Executive & Clinical Director Recovery Center of Baton RougeQ: What is the most rewarding part of being on staff at The Recovery Center Intensive Outpatient Program?
I find joy and purpose in watching individuals and families reconnect and heal through recovery. 

Q: What do you like to do for fun?
I enjoy attending La. festivals, concerts and plays. Travel is my real passion. My goal is to visit all the places on my bucket list.

Q: What is the most challenging aspect of your job?
Accepting when I have done all that I can and helping families to let go.

Q: Do people really recover from alcohol and drug addiction?
Definitely, just go to a birthday meeting at AA or a speaker meeting to see the miracles of recovery

Q: Do you have any pets?
Yes. I have a 3 year old Boxer named Remy and a 6.5 year old Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Abby.

Q: What are the most common barriers to recovery you see people face in early on in their treatment?
I think the need to change friends and developing a new social support system is very challenging. Also the idea of surrendering to a new lifestyle.

Q: What is your favorite restaurant?
Middendorf’s in Manchac, La.

Q: What lead you to work in the addiction recovery field?
After working in the criminal justice system early in my career, I began to believe that there had to be a better solution than the “revolving door” in prisons. I am also an ACOA.

Q: What is your style of facilitating group sessions?
I would have to say that I am laid back but will confront when necessary. I also use humor as a means to build relationships within the group.

Q: What is the most important thing you’d like your clients to learn while in treatment?
That there is always hope.

Q: Who are your role models?
I would have to say my mother and my daughter. My mother taught me to be self-reliant. My daughter taught me to take risks and the meaning of unconditional love. Of course I have had several mentors over the years.

Q: How would you describe The Recovery Center?
A place where you are always welcome and a Staff that is truly a family that cares and will go that extra mile to help you.

Q: What’s your favorite movie?
“To Kill a Mockingbird”with Gregory Peck.

Get to know our team - David "Fritz" Vogt

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Monday, February 16, 2015
David Vogt Family Therapist Recovery Center of Baton Rouge Q: What is the most rewarding part of being on staff at The Recovery Center Intensive Outpatient Program?
Having the opportunity to help families find recovery. I also enjoy the camaraderie and support of the other staff members.

Q: What do you like to do for fun? 
My idea of fun typically involves spending time with my wife and our one year old son. I also enjoy hunting, fishing, and college football.

Q: What is the most challenging aspect of your job? 
Witnessing the devastation addiction causes to families.

Q: Do people really recover from drug and alcohol addiction? 
Yes, they do really recover. Not only do they get better, but often times they achieve a higher level of functioning than they ever previously experienced. This being said, in order to stay healthy individuals must actively work on their recovery.

Q: Do you have any pets? 
We have two family dogs. One is a miniature dachshund named Chuck and the other is a miniature schnauzer named Izzy.

Q: What are the most common barriers to recovery you see people face in early on in their treatment? 
Letting go of old (unhealthy) friends and relationships. People also tend to struggle finding fun sober things to do.

Q: What is your favorite restaurant? 
Charlie’s in Springfield Louisiana

Q: What lead you to work in the addiction recovery field?
I began my own recovery in 2001. Shortly after completing extended care treatment I began working at the facility as a technician. I really enjoyed working with the clients and it became apparent that this would be a rewarding career choice.

Q: What is your style of facilitating group sessions? 
I view group as an opportunity for participants to support and learn from each other. As a facilitator, it is my job to direct and educate where needed. At the same time, allowing the group process to be as natural as possible.

Q: What is the most important thing you’d like your clients to learn while in treatment? 
That life can be and is fulfilling without using substances.

Q: Who are your role models? 
My Mother and Father

Q: How would you describe The Recovery Center? 
A caring place that provides opportunities for people to get better.

Q: What’s your favorite movie? 
Any movie I watch from the comfort of my la-z-boy recliner.

Get to know our team - CEO Rudy Troyer

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Tuesday, February 10, 2015
Rudy Troyer CEO The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge Q: What is the most rewarding part of being on staff at The Recovery Center Intensive Outpatient Program? 
Watching lives and families be restored from the depths of addiction. Being able to freely share my Faith with others.

Q: What do you like to do for fun? 
Fishing, Gardening, Shooting, Hanging out with my Family & Church. 

Q: What is the most challenging aspect of your job? 
When we lose a patient to overdose or suicide. 

Q: Do people really recover from drug and alcohol addiction? 
Yes! Addiction and Alcoholism Treatment is hard work and requires a lot of willingness and surrender, but you can be set free of addiction. (John 8:36)

Q: Do you have any pets? 
Two cats (Bob & Jack) and a Boxer (Lucy). We wanted to get some goats, but my wife and I seem to disagree on their ultimate purpose (My Wife = pets and maybe milk; Me = Dinner). 

Q: What are the most common barriers to recovery you see people face in early on in their treatment? 
Letting go of your old lifestyle and relationships, spiritual barriers, cravings, withdrawal (Heroin and Prescription Drugs), emotional pain, depression, and anxiety. 

Q: What is your favorite restaurant? 
Rocky & Carlo’s in Chalmette 

Q: What lead you to work in the addiction recovery field? 
I went through treatment in 1997 and have been in recovery ever since. I wanted to give back the gifts I have been given by those who helped me.   

Q: What is your style of facilitating group sessions? 
Serious about change and recovery, yet laid back. Sarcastic. 

Q: What is the most important thing you’d like your clients to learn while in treatment? 
God’s Grace & Hope.

Q: Who are your role models? 
Jesus Christ, My Dad, Billy Graham, My Pastor, & Ben Camp

Q: How would you describe The Recovery Center? 
Family.

Q: What’s your favorite movie? 
The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly

Five Keys to Providing Women a Successful Sober Living Environment

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Monday, January 26, 2015

From the Desk of Rudy L. Troyer, LCSW

Sober Living for Women Program

Sober Living Homes, also referred to as Transitional Living Homes or Halfway Houses, have long become an affordable option for providing an individual in early recovery a long-term, safe, and structured living environment where they can develop bonds with others in recovery and learn how to maintain their own long-term sobriety. Unfortunately, many sober living homes fail to truly provide an individualized experience that meets the specific and unique needs of each resident, particularly for women.

Through my family intervention business, private therapy practice, and co-owning The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge’s Intensive Outpatient Program with Marcia Bannister, LAC, I have had the opportunity work with hundreds, if not over a thousand, women in early recovery. I have learned from each of them specific needs of Women in early recover that differ sharply from men. More specifically, I have realized that there a several key components a Sober Living Program must provide if they are to afford their residents the healing necessary to over-come addiction and/or alcoholism. These components are as follows:

  1. Sober Living Needs to be a Step-Down in the full treatment continuum.

    Simply stated, for most Women suffering addiction or alcoholism issues, they will have a very hard time maintaining their recovery in a sober living environment if they have not first had adequate residential or intensive outpatient treatment. In our Sober Living for Women Program, all residents must have a minimum of thirty (30) days of sobriety and successfully completed an approved residential or outpatient treatment program or be currently a patient in our Intensive Outpatient Program. Furthermore, all of our residents also participate in a weekly 90-minute aftercare therapy group for women. Our residents also participate in a weekly community group lead by Mrs. Bannister and are encouraged to be engaged in outside individual therapy. This provides a sense of stability in the home for all residents. Sober Living environments are not equipped, clinically or medically, to provide Women the structure and support required during the first month of their recovery.

  2. Accountability, support, love, and boundaries.

    Addictions cannot survive without the deterioration of the person’s values and morals, boundary violations, dishonesty, and withdrawal from family and loved-ones. In stark contrast, recovery from addiction requires honesty, accountability, developing and repairing relationships, and the restoration of healthy boundaries, morals, and values. At our Sober Living for Women Program, each resident works closely with Marcia Bannister, LAC, their peers, AA/NA or Faith-Based Recovery Group Sponsors, their therapy group, and therapists in learning how to live a sober, healthy, and fulfilling life in recovery. Men are not allowed at Our Sober Living program unless they have been approved by our clinical team. Our program lovingly provides women with the support, accountability, and structure necessary to overcome their addictions.

  3. Support from other women in 12-step or faith based recovery.

    We cannot recover alone. Our residents are provide support from our Staff (specifically, Marcia Bannister, LAC) and the recovering community. They are encouraged to be actively working a program in AA, NA, or Faith-Based Groups such as Celebrate Recovery or New Beginnings at Healing Place Church. They are also encouraged to attend church weekly.

  4. Provide a home that is a “home.”

    Our Sober Living for Women Program strives to provide a comfortable, safe, and family like atmosphere. Our biggest hope is that our residents want to call our program “home” during this phase of their treatment and recovery.

  5. Provide both 12-step and Faith-Based recovery

    Many programs fail to provide Christians struggling with addiction issues a recovery plan that respects their spiritual beliefs. At The Recovery Center, we provide an optional Christian recovery Program that includes weekly Bible Study, meetings with a Christian Counselor, and introduction to local Churches that provide Faith-Based Recovery groups.

5 Misconceptions About Getting Sober

The Recovery Center of Baton Rouge - Wednesday, October 08, 2014

From the Desk of Greg Tiritilli, BA, RAC

Entering into a rehab program usually means that things are falling apart.
Mostly likely you are having to come to terms with the fact that you messed up, got caught, ran out of money, or ran out of time, you got sick, you got fired (or about to be fired), you flipped out, or, in very rare cases, saw the light. You are facing problems with the law, or with family, friends are angry, bank accounts are empty, and you've run out of options. In the world of addiction treatment and recovery these are common consequences.

So, now you painted yourself into a corner and have to do something. As the treatment option becomes realistic, it’s inevitable that certain fears and misconceptions will arise in one’s imagination. Now, the idea of rehab is blowing your mind with all of the imagined whining and carrying on, the caterwauling, coffee and cigarettes, groups, droning on and on about who knows what! How could that possibly help? Complaining and consoling, consoling and complaining and no hope of fun.

We've compiled a list of a few of the most common fears and misconceptions about getting sober:

  1. I'm about to be bored and lonely because you're gonna make me give up all my friends.

    The truth is, in the first few days, this is sort of true. Going from a life of drama and conflict, avoiding police, managing secrets and lies, and getting loaded the whole time to a life of 12 step meetings and therapy group will be a jolting change. Most people have to fight the urge to stay in bed and isolate, depression and fatigue are normal parts of early sobriety. And as far as giving up friends, you're all grown up and you get to decide for yourself who should and shouldn't be your friends. Treatment can help you understand how to make those decisions. You may have to make certain sacrifices, both temporary and permanent, for the greater good. If you can hang on and weather the storm of being new, things will get better. People don't get sober to be removed from life, we get sober in order to get back to the things we really want. With some effort and open mindedness you will be able to replace all that you have to give up. Remember, the goal is not boredom, the goal is staying out of jail, keeping your marriage, keeping your job, and living a healthy life.

  2. AA/NA and treatment are lame and I don't want to belong.

    This is a tricky one. It seems like whenever you defend something as not being lame it becomes more lame than ever. It’s easy to fall into the stereotyping fallacy when judging the 12 step programs from the outside looking in. Popular culture has made this negative impression very easy to conjure up. The problem and solution is that you will find what you're looking for. In other words, if you go in expecting to hate everything and everyone then you will probably fulfill that expectation. However, if you look for people with similar interest and sensibilities you will definitively find that too. As stated in the above section, the change from what you know will be jarring, and most people resist change, but if you can embrace something different for the greater good then you will find yourself pleasantly surprised. The truth is, just like in everything else, some things you'll like and some things you will not like.

  3. The opiates were my problem not alcohol, or the alcohol not the pot, the cocaine not the pills, or the needle not the bottle, etcetera, etcetera, etc.

    Trying to navigate early recovery can be difficult and scary. A lot of preconceived notions about substance use and addiction will be challenged. Without a full clinical assessment and history it’s really hard to determine exactly what is occurring. But if a person meets the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorder then he/she will have some hard truths to face. The reality of cross addiction suggests that if a person has an addiction to one substance then there is a very high likelihood that that person will have addiction problems with all classes of addictive substances. We have seen, time and time again, people relapse on a substance that was not there drug of choice, only to be led back to their drug of choice or to begin using the other substance inappropriately. Sometimes it helps to think of the substance use as if it were a vehicle to get you where you want to go. Some people prefer a car, others a motorcycle, and still others like trucks, but they are all vehicles. Personal preferences, functionality, and brain chemistry determine which drug does it for you and once a substance is ingested the addiction takes over. The safe bet is to abstain from all mood altering chemicals to give you the best chance of not falling back into the clutches of active addiction.

  4. I just need a chance to get past the withdrawals then I'll be fine.

    Initially, the thing that scared most people away from recovery is the thought of detox and withdrawals. The expectation of getting sick is so scary to some people that they will continue using or drinking long past the point of enjoying the substance use. Once the decision is made to check in to a detox program or work with a doctor to dry out, things start to get better. Often times, the expectation of sickness was far worse than the reality. After a few days the person starts feeling better, thinking starts to clear up, they may even become excited about the future. This “flight into health” is a very dangerous time in early recovery. Getting the substances out of the system is a vital part of the process, but it is only the first part. Without continued treatment and therapy a person will not be prepared for when the flight into health ends, which it inevitably will after a few days or weeks and they fall back into the feelings that led to the addiction in the first place. Engaging in treatment and therapy can help a person to address the underlying issues that contributed to the inappropriate substance use. It can also provide new healthier coping skills and tools to prevent a return to drug/alcohol use. Sometimes getting sober is easier than staying sober.

  5. I'm not really an addict I just need to learn to control it.

    Gosh, that sure would make life a lot easier if this were only a phase, or a part of growing up, or college, or a rut from depression. If the use could be easily explained and dismissed as a symptom of your circumstances then you would be normal and you could get back to being happy like you were before this whole mess got started. Letting go of this fantasy is crucial in moving ahead with your life. The fact is you got to where you are now in spite of your best intentions. No one planed on getting a DWI or failing out of school, most likely, the plan was to have some fun or blow off some steam. If this were a phase or something you could control then why didn't you? How could you, someone who has been successful at so many other things, let this happen? As a person gets further into their addiction they begin to lose control of their life. An addicted person becomes powerless over choosing not to use or drink and the consequences begin to pile up. Without a full clinical assessment it’s difficult to determine is a person is an addict, however if you are in a place in your life were you are considering addiction treatment, regardless of what is motivating you, it would behoove you to take a close look at how you got into this spot. Often times treatment is not about selling you on addiction so much as it is about helping you take an honest look at your life.